Plant Your Plate

Plant Your Plate

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Get garden-to-table tips and inspiration for growing your own food and delicious recipes for using up your harvest, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. Plus, find edible gardening advice and garden plans from our friends at Better Homes & Gardens.
 
 
 
 

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From garden to the table, get tips and inspiration for growing your own food and delicious recipes for using up your harvest, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. We've also partnered with our friends at Better Homes & Gardens to bring you edible gardening advice and garden plans.
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What’s Fresh: The Best and Worst Apples for Eating, Cooking & Baking

Submitted by admin on Fri, 08/17/2018 - 11:30

All apples are not created equal—at least when it comes to cooking vs. eating them fresh. But regardless of variety, they’re all good for you. A medium apple (3-inch diameter) contains 4 grams of fiber; a large apple (3 1/4-inch diameter) has 5 grams of fiber. Apples also offer a bit of vitamin C and potassium.

Related: 25 Delicious Fall Apple Recipes

So what apples are best for your lunchbox and what apples are best suited for your apple pie? Well, that depends.

DIY Spa Treatments You Can Make in 10 Minutes

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My favorite beauty shop? From the time I was young, it's been the kitchen. Nowhere is nature's innate capacity to heal and beautify more evident.

DIY Seasonings & Herb Mixes You Can Make at Home

Sponsored by Hillshire Farm® Brand

Dried herb mixes are a simple way to add flavor to food without extra calories or additives. But many packaged seasonings can contain preservatives, anti-caking agents or additional sodium. So why not make your own homemade seasonings? Making herb mixes at home gives you ultimate control over the ingredients to make them healthier—and you can customize the flavors to your liking. If you grow your own herbs, this is a great way to use up your garden bounty.

How to Freeze 16 Fruits and Vegetables

Submitted by admin on Fri, 07/06/2018 - 14:04
How to Freeze 16 Fruits and Vegetables

Guidelines for Prepping, Blanching & Freezing Produce

This summer, head out to a pick-your-own farm to stock up on fresh berries or put up your bumper crop of broccoli, peas or peppers. On the following pages we’ll show you how to preserve fruits and vegetables when they are at their nutritional peak, so you can use them throughout the year.

How to Make Dried Apples and Apple Chips in the Oven

Submitted by admin on Fri, 07/06/2018 - 13:41

It's easy to make dried apples and their crispier cousins, apple chips, at home in your oven without a food dehydrator.


Here’s how to do it in a home oven:

1. Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of oven; preheat to 200°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. Combine 4 cups water and 1/2 cup lemon juice in a medium bowl. (The lemon juice helps prevent browning.)

Make Your Own Herbal Tea Blends

Photos: AJ Ragasa (Glasswing)

One of the easiest ways to incorporate more homegrown edibles into your daily diet is to add herbs. We often remember to cook with herbs, but tend to forget that using them in a beverage can be just as rewarding. Besides having amazing scents, herbs have medicinal properties that are sometimes amplified with the addition of hot water.

The Best Way to Preserve Hot Peppers

Shown: Varieties of sweet and hot peppers.

Sponsored by Hillshire Farm® Brand

Hot peppers are great to have on hand, but if you've ever grown them yourself, you may have found that too much of a good thing can be a bit of a problem. What do you do with tons of hot peppers when you can only enjoy a few at a time? Well, I'm here to tell you: this is a good problem to have. Hot peppers are easy to preserve and enjoy long after the peak growing season is past. Check out my favorite ways to preserve and enjoy hot peppers below.